Fun link for Monday: Queen Victoria’s Journals

I stumbled upon this online exihibit of  Queen Victoria’s Journals  while on Twitter, from @AndrewSBowman. It is a collection of Queen Victoria’s writings detailing her life and experiences, which are pretty unique and amazing to read about, but it also illustrates her drawings and paintings.

I knew that Queen Victoria was an artist; I had seen some of her sketch books come up on Antiques Roadshow, but I was still amazed to see how much she documented.   It is strange to think that the royal figures whom she sketched were not just generic princes and princesses, as many young people might doodle in their sketchbooks, but people she actually knew and conversed with. It makes you think about how different a life she had from the everyday person.

What do you think of her journals?

Enjoy!

Queen Victoria’s Journals

Book Review: The Beacon at Alexandria

I first read The Beacon at Alexandria, by Gillian bradshaw in 1999 when I was in Grade 11; it had been leant to me by my latin teacher as ‘a book that I should like’ – I didn’t just like it – I loved it!  It istantly became my favourite book, and it has remained my favourite book ever since. Twelve years ago I reviewed the Beacon at Alexandria on Chapters.ca when I finally purchased my very own copy.

“I will start off by saying that If I could rank this book higher than five I would! I loved this book so much! The characters are incredibly real, so much so that you begin to feel like you know them. There problems become your problems. I found myself loathing Festinus and cheering for young Charis. I guarantee that anyone who picks up this book will enjoy it as much as I did!”

My review remains the only one on this site, but there are many more favourable reviews on goodreads.com.

I think it is safe to say that The Beacon at Alexandria, which is about a head strong and independent thinking girl living in the late Roman Empire, likely inspired some of my early choices in life. – Latin in class in general certainly solidified my desire to study Classics – but The Beacon at Alexandria was about a girl near my own age (at the time, lol) doing what she wanted to do and being successful despite the time, place and political atmosphere she found herself in. I think she inspired me to take risks and every time I read it, which I do every 3 or 4 years, I am inspired anew. Perhaps it is time to pick it up again!

If you love historical fiction, roman history, ancient medicine, women’s literature, religious/political history or just the ancient world in general, I am pretty sure you will love this book too.

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑