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Education programming at Denny abbey and the Farmland Museum

The Wandering Museum Consultant

In the second half of my week at the Farmland Museum, I worked primarily with the Education programming.  This included observing an outreach session and the final event day for the Enid Porter Project, part of a county-wide project using the Enid Porter archives held at the Museum of Cambridge,  as well as putting together a new children`s trail for the museum.

I tagged along with Chris, the Education Officer, to a school in nearby Waterbeach to observe an outreach program entitled `Fenland Life`. This workshop focuses on life in the region prior to the draining of the large fen, which originally covered the area. Draining of the Fen began in the 17th C. , ceasing a centuries old way of life of the ‘Fen People’. This program teaches students everyday life for people living in the marshy environment: how they got around in the fen (on stilts)…

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Denny Abbey

My week at the Farmland Museum started out with the Denny Abbey archaeological collection 😀

The Education Officer, Chris, was in need of a handling collection for school groups of the archaeological material from Denny Abbey. Now there is nothing I like more than poking around in archaeological collections, so I was quite happy to do it.

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England and Scotland—Day 7-14

The Wide and Winding

Day 7 Greenhead —> Haltwhistle

Today we left our B&B and hiked up (another!) very large hill to the Roman Army Museum. After spending some time there, we took the Hadrian’s Wall bus (it exists after all!) to the Milecastle Inn in Haltwhistle, where we ate pub food and hung out until the people who generously offered to accommodate us, Beth and Alex, arrived with a group of their students. The group had been hiking a section of the wall. Soon after, we walked to their house, got settled in, and had a delicious fajita dinner. It was nice to be among friends!

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Day 8 Haltwhistle

Our feet and legs still achy from the first two days of the hike, we were not up for doing much walking. Beth, drove us to the Roman Army Museum, where we had left off the day before, and we hiked from…

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England—Days 5-6

The Wide and Winding

Day 5 Carlisle —> Walton

After leaving our hostel in Carlisle to grab breakfast on-the-go, we were to begin our journey to hike Hadrian’s wall. Just then, I felt a rain drop on my head. Then another…until it was solidly raining. It took us a bit of time to make sure we were actually headed in the right direction (despite some signage, it was not all that clear on the way out). Katie was quite the trooper and was carrying her backpack for the hike; I, on the other hand, decided to use a luggage transfer service to have mine delivered to each new destination. I found this a worthy investment! We were excited to begin, and in relatively good spirits, despite the rain and cold wind. We saw a few other walkers who were mostly headed in the opposite direction to us. On and on we walked for about…

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Nipper the HMV Dog

This past week I have been at the Hurdy Gurdy Museum of Vintage Radio in Howth, just outside of Dublin. It is a museum that celebrates collecting, and Pat Herbert has built an incredible collection going back to the very beginnings of radio. I will write a post soon that goes into more detail about the history of radio (I am working on an online exhibit on the subject for the museum), but today I want to talk about the story behind Nipper the HMV dog.

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